Monthly Archives: April 2016

On Tuesday, May 3 support textile projects through Valley Gives

ValleyGives

As we mentioned in a recent post, the Charlemont Historical Society is focusing on the theme of textiles this year. The activities we are pursuing related to this theme are:

  • proper care for and display of the textiles in the Society’s collection;
  • hosting a public talk on a textile-related theme;
  • digitizing our textile collection, so that it is available online for anyone, anywhere;
  • organizing a community quilting bee to create a new quilt for the Historical Society’s collection.

We are raising funds for these efforts through Valley Gives, a one-day festival of philanthropy that benefits nonprofits in the Pioneer Valley region of western Massachusetts. Valley Gives is coming up on Tuesday, May 3 — and we would appreciate your support!

For more information about our current projects and to make a gift to support them, please go to:

https://valleygives.razoo.com/us/story/Charlemont-Historical-Society

Thank you in advance for your support!

Spring newsletter in the mail

Spring 2016 Newsletter

One of the benefits of membership in the Charlemont Historical Society is a quarterly newsletter. The spring issue, which is in the mail now, covers

  • Work we are doing to digitize the Society’s collection, making it available online for anyone to view;
  • News about student volunteers who will be joining us for a community service day next week
  • An overview of the theme for this year’s projects and events
  • A profile of a tailor who ran a shop in the Charlemont village center during the 1800s.
  • Information about sheep farming in Charlemont
  • Details about upcoming Society events

Although the spring newsletter was mailed yesterday to existing members, it’s not too late to get your copy! Annual membership in the Charlemont Historical Society costs $20. Information about other membership benefits, along with a membership form, are available on the “Join” page of this website. There are a lot of exciting things going on at the Society now, and we always welcome new members. Please join us!

Focus on textiles

Quilt3

Detail from a quilting bee quilt in the Charlemont Historical Society collection. Some of the quilt blocks have handwritten information about the women who made the quilt, including their names, the towns where they lived, and dates.

 

The Charlemont Historical Society currently is focusing on the theme of textiles. To that end, we are working on:

  • proper care for and display of the textiles in our collection;
  • hosting a public talk by Marla Miller, author of Betsy Ross and the Making of America on Flag Day, Tuesday, June 14
  • making information about, and photographs of, our textile collection available online;
  • organizing a community quilting bee to create a new quilt for the Historical Society’s collection.

We are participating in Valley Gives Day Tuesday, May 3 – to help raise funds for these projects. Please consider making a gift to the Charlemont Historical Society for Valley Gives on Tuesday, May 3. Thank you!

This Sunday: Tom Wessels on “Reading the Forested Landscape”

Please join us this Sunday, May 1 at 2:00pm for a workshop by Tom Wessels, “Reading the Forested Landscape: A Natural History of New England.” The event, which the Charlemont Historical Society is co-sponsoring with the Tyler Memorial Library, will be held at Hawlemont Regional Elementary School, 10 School Street, Charlemont, MA. 
wesselstomTom Wessels is an ecologist and founding director of the master’s degree program in Conservation Biology at Antioch University New England. Based on Tom’s book, Reading the Forested Landscape: A Natural History of New England, this workshop introduces approaches used to interpret a forest’s history. Using evidence such as the shapes of trees, scars on their trunks, the pattern of decay in stumps, the construction of stone walls, and the lay of the land, it is possible to unravel complex stories etched into our forested landscape. This process could easily be called forest forensics, since it is quite similar to interpreting a crime scene.